Monthly Archives: March 2016

Norfolk’s Famous Farmers’ Markets

Farmers MarketOne of the most fertile parts of the UK, Norfolk has long been known for the quality of its meat, dairy, fruit and veg. From handmade cheeses and specialist sausages to delicious jams and plump, ripe vegetables, the county boasts a range of mouth-watering delicacies and specialities. Visitors to Norfolk can sample this outstanding produce at one of the many farmers markets that dot the county. Fun, vibrant and full of tantalising sights and smells, these markets are the perfect introduction to Norfolk’s culinary heritage.

Farmers’ markets take place in towns, villages and cities across Norfolk throughout the year. Some of the most famous markets are located in Norwich, Loddon, Creake Abbey, Poringland and Fakenham, though smaller markets and farm shops can be found throughout the county. As well as fruit, veg, meat and dairy, a lot of farmers markets also offer plants for sale and most boast a choice of food stands.

Farmers Market 2The vast majority of the produce on offer in Norfolk’s farmers’ markets is grown locally. Most markets ensure that at least 70% of the food sold is produced in Norfolk, giving visitors the chance to sample the very best ingredients the county has to offer. Fans of cheese will be spoiled for choice as Norfolk is home to some of the tastiest vintages in the country. From Binham Blue and Wighton to Wells Alpine and Warham, Norfolk boasts some of the most varied and delicious cheese made anywhere in the UK. Other products you may come across at Norfolk’s farmers’ markets include fresh, crunchy broccoli, firm, ripe tomatoes, fragrant mint and, or course, mustard. Holidaymakers who visit markets close to the sea may also come across the world famous Cromer Crab, freshly harvest samphire and mouth-watering Brancaster mussels.

Head Chef Chris Marshall & his team at the King William love working with our very own county’s produce and we try to use locally sourced meat, fruit and veg wherever possible. Not only does this allow us to produce outstanding meals for you, it also gives you the chance to try some of the best produce in the country.

Creake Abbey 1st Saturday of every month. 9.30am – 1pm at Creake Abbey
Fakenham 4th Saturday of every month. 8.30am – 12pm. at Fakenham Market Square
Holt Country Market every Friday. 9am – 11am. at St Andrews Church Hall
Norwich Monthly 9am-3pm at the Forum
Sandringham 4th Sunday of every month. 10am – 3pm, at Sandringham Visitor Centre.
Thornham last Saturday of every month. 9.30am – 12.30pm, at Thornham Deli.

 

 

The plight of the whales in Hunstanton

Since January 2016, more than 30 sperm whales have washed up on the beaches of northern and eastern England, causing scientists to look more closely at their behaviour, their habitat and anything that could be damaging them.

Sperm whales
dead sperm whaleThe sperm whale is a truly incredibly creature. Able to grow up to whopping 20.5 metres in length, the creatures are the biggest toothed predator on earth. The sperm whale is also the second deepest diving mammal on the planet and is able to reach depths of 2,250m. Sperm whales can be found in oceans around the world, however only adult male whales venture into the cooler waters found in higher latitudes. In general, sperm whales stick to deep off shore waters, favouring depths of over 1000m.

Why are sperm whales beaching in Norfolk?
Scientists don’t know for sure why sperm whales have begun to wash up on the county’s shoreline. One theory is that all of the whales have come from a single bachelor pod that took a wrong turn in the North Sea, an area where adult males are known to live in relatively large numbers. If this is the case, the recent spate of sperm whales beaching on Norfolk’s shores may soon come to an end. However, scientists fear that the beachings could be the result of a series of whale pods becoming disorientated and finding themselves suddenly in shallower waters. This could point to a more fundamental problem with the whales’ natural environment and could mean that the sad beachings will continue in the future.

How can we help the whales?
sperm-whale-tail
If you, like many people in Norfolk, have been moved by the plight of the whales, there are lots of different ways to help these magnificent creatures. One thing that many environmental agencies and charities are asking is that the public not damage the carcases in any way. In the past, trophy hunters have cut teeth and bones from deceased whales in order to make ghoulish souvenirs. Not only does this make it harder for scientists to work out why the whales died, it is also upsetting for those working hard to help the whales. You can also help by supporting the BDMLR with your donation. The British Divers Marine Life Rescue. is an organisation dedicated to the rescue and well-being of all marine animals in distress around the UK. Visit their website on http://www.bdmlr.org.uk
MARINE ANIMAL RESCUE HOTLINE: 01825 765546 during office hours.
(07787 433412 out of office hours)